Eric Moons
Room: 1310

Computer Science Principles

Computer Science AP

Cybersecurity

Robotics1

Robotics 2

Academic Decathlon

Contact Me:
    Email: eric.moons@misd.org
    Phone: 936-276-4000  x84760

Conference:

1st Period  7:20 - 8:57

Additional Tutorial Opportunities:

TBD

Welcome Video

0:00 / 0:00

Google Classroom Codes 
** If you are taking Computer Science Principles, please make sure you sign up for the correct class period**

2nd period Academic Decathlon - vq5teg3
3rd period Computer Science Principles - creb73f
4th period Intro to Robotics - k7rr5af
5th period Advanced Robotics - ewoi5gt
6th period Computer Science Principles - tughpxs
7th period AP Computer Science A - z7yyhdk
8th period Cybersecurity 
- lwepm2n

 

Schedule

Period Class Time
 1 Conference  7:20 - 8:57
 2 Academic Decathlon  9:03 - 10:45
 3 CSP  10:51 - 12:57
 4 Intro to Robotics 1  1:03 - 2:40
 5 Advanced Robotics  7:20 - 8:57   
 6 CSP  9:03 - 10:45
 7  AP CSA  10:51 - 12:57
 8 Cybersecurity  1:03 - 2:40

AP Computer Science A

The AP test will be on Friday, May 8

The AP Computer Science A course is the second Project Lead the Way (PLTW) computer science course. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable.

At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods.

In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course. The topic outline on pages 8–10 of the AP Computer Science A Course Description (pdf) (opens PDF document) summarizes the content typically taught in the AP Computer Science A course.

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Supplies

Students will need to have a flash drive to store files for this class.   Please write your name on the drive or attach it to an identifiable key chain so that it can be returned to you if lost.

 

Grading Policy

A variety of methods will be used to evaluate each student’s progress. 30% percent of the grade will come from daily assignments and labs, while major projects and tests will account for 70%. To ensure that each student takes the daily lab assignments seriously, I will from time to time use the student's lab average as an additional major grade in the 70%.  The Montgomery High School re-testing policy does not apply to AP Computer Science.

During this class, students will prepare for the AP test and cover the following topics: 
Program and Class Design
Program Implementation
Program Analysis
Data Structures
Standard Algorithms
Computing in Context

Computer Science Principles

Computer Science Principles is Project Lead the Way's foundation Computer Science course as well as part of the pre-engineering program. Using Python® as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. CSP helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation. 

 

Supplies

 

Students will need to have a flash drive to store files for this class.   Please write your name on the drive or attach it to an identifiable key chain so that it can be returned to you if lost.

 

Grading Policy
 

A variety of methods will be used to evaluate each student’s progress. 20% percent of the grade will come from daily assignments and labs, while major projects and tests will account for 80%. To ensure that each student takes the daily lab assignments seriously, I will from time to time use the student's lab average as an additional major grade in the 80%.  The Lake Creek High School re-testing policy does not apply to AP Computer Science.


Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity introduces the tools and concepts of cybersecurity and encourages students to create solutions that allow people to share computing resources while protecting privacy. Nationally, computational resources are vulnerable and frequently attacked; in Cybersecurity, students solve problems by understanding and closing these vulnerabilities. This course raises students’ knowledge of and commitment to ethical computing behavior. It also aims to develop students’ skills as consumers, friends, citizens, and employees who can effectively contribute to communities with a dependable cyber-infrastructure that moves and processes information safely.

Supplies

Students will need to have a flash drive to store files for this class.   Please write your name on the drive or attach it to an identifiable key chain so that it can be returned to you if lost.

 

Grading Policy

A variety of methods will be used to evaluate each student’s progress. 20% percent of the grade will come from daily assignments and labs, while major projects and tests will account for 80%. To ensure that each student takes the daily lab assignments seriously, I will from time to time use the student's lab average as an additional major grade in the 80%.  The Lake Creek High School re-testing policy does not apply to AP Computer Science.

Robotics 1

Grade Level: 10-12

Course Content Access: http://curriculum.vexrobotics.com

Course Description, Goals, & Options: Autodesk's VEX Robotics Curriculum is divided up into twelve primary units and one optional unit. In a flexible format, students learn about engineering and engineering problem solving. They will be given introductions to the VEX Robotics Design System and Autodesk® Inventor® while learning key STEM principles through a process that captures the excitement and engagement of robotics competition. The curriculum is heavily focused on mechatronic principles; as such, programming is NOT required. However this course is structured in such a way that teachers and students who want to include a more Computer Science heavy layer with the course can do so. For information on the programming options available, consult http://www.vexrobotics.com/programming

Course Outline:

Unit 1: Introduction to Engineering

Unit 2: Introduction to Robotics

Unit 3: Introduction to VEXnet

Unit 4: Introduction to Autodesk Inventor

Unit 5: THE GAME!

Unit 6: Object Manipulation

Unit 7: Speed, Power, Torque & DC Motors

Unit 8: Mechanical Power Transmission

Unit 9: Drivetrain Design

Unit 10: Lifting Mechanisms

Unit 11: Systems Integration

Unit 12: Testing and the Iteration Process

Expectations:

This course is designed to build the foundation for competitive robotics and will require you to be part of a team and engage in team activities. Some of the assignments given will require time outside of class. You are expected to meet deadlines and assignment dates and work with your teammates to finish assignments. You will also be required to help host a robotics tournament in the fall (at Lake Creek High School and spring (at Montgomery High School). Students who do not meet the basic expectations may not be eligible to take Advanced Robotics the following year.

Grades are based on the following guidelines.

An AVERAGE student:

  • Follows rules. Follows directions.
  • Is on task MOST of the time. Is prepared for class.
  • Is on time to class.
  • Picks up and cleans up area. Returns material to its proper location.
  • Always turns in assignments on the date assigned.
  • Keeps a fairly accurate engineering notebook

An EXCELLENT student: does all that an average student does, but...

  • Is ALWAYS on task.
  • Asks relevant questions.
  • Keeps an accurate engineering notebook
  • Positively assists other students when asked.
  • Helps others pick up and clean up after finishing own.
  • Always turns in assignments on the date assigned.
  • Attends all events

Average work = 80 - 89        Average work is defined as work that:

  • Mostly follows instructions and examples.
  • Consistently answers 8 out of 10 questions.
  • Is neat, legible, and complete.
  • Is on time.
  • Shows some understanding of material, concepts, or skills.

           

Excellent work >90   Excellent work is defined as work that:

  • Completely follows instructions and examples.
  • Consistently answers 10 of 10 questions correctly.
  • Shows complete understanding and use of knowledge or skills gained.

Your six weeks grade will be based on the following:

Daily/Weekly).............................................    20%

Assessments and Projects/Test................... 80%

                                                                       ------

Six weeks grade                                             100%

         Daily- 20%

  • Homework
  • Classwork
  • Quizzes
  • Short/minor projects and/or presentations
  • Hands-on labs, assessment of process

    Projects/Tests 80%

  • Unit tests or portfolios
  • Cumulative projects and/or presentations

  • Engineering Notebook




    Materials
    :

  • Map Pencils (12 colors)
  • Mechanical pencils
  • 5 x 5 Graph Paper Composition Book
  • Scotch Tape

Robotics 2

Grade Level: 10-12

Course Content Access: http://curriculum.vexrobotics.com

Expectations:

This course is designed for competitive robotics and will require you to be part of a team and engage in team activities. Some of the assignments given will require time outside of class. You are expected to meet deadlines and assignment dates and work with your teammates to finish assignments. You will also be required to help host a robotics tournament in the fall (at Lake Creek High School and spring (at Montgomery High School). Students who do not meet the basic expectations may not be eligible to take Advanced Robotics the following year.

Grades are based on the following guidelines.

An AVERAGE student:

  • Follows rules. Follows directions.
  • Is on task MOST of the time. Is prepared for class.
  • Is on time to class.
  • Picks up and cleans up area. Returns material to its proper location.
  • Always turns in assignments on the date assigned.
  • Keeps a fairly accurate engineering notebook

An EXCELLENT student: does all that an average student does, but...

  • Is ALWAYS on task.
  • Asks relevant questions.
  • Keeps an accurate engineering notebook
  • Positively assists other students when asked.
  • Helps others pick up and clean up after finishing own.
  • Always turns in assignments on the date assigned.
  • Attends all events

Average work = 80 - 89        Average work is defined as work that:

  • Mostly follows instructions and examples.
  • Consistently answers 8 out of 10 questions.
  • Is neat, legible, and complete.
  • Is on time.
  • Shows some understanding of material, concepts, or skills.

           

Excellent work >90   Excellent work is defined as work that:

  • Completely follows instructions and examples.
  • Consistently answers 10 of 10 questions correctly.
  • Shows complete understanding and use of knowledge or skills gained.

Your six weeks grade will be based on the following:

Daily/Weekly).............................................    20%

Assessments and Projects/Test................... 80%

                                                                       ------

Six weeks grade                                             100%

         Daily- 20%

  • Homework
  • Classwork
  • Quizzes
  • Short/minor projects and/or presentations
  • Hands-on labs, assessment of process

    Projects/Tests 80%

  • Unit tests or portfolios
  • Cumulative projects and/or presentations

  • Engineering Notebook




    Materials
    :

  • Map Pencils (12 colors)
  • Mechanical pencils
  • 5 x 5 Graph Paper Composition Book
  • Scotch Tape

OVERVIEW

The United States Academic Decathlon, the premier national scholastic competition for high school students, was created to provide opportunities for students to experience the challenges of rigorous team and individual academic competition. Each student competes in ten events: Art, Economics, Essay, Interview, Literature, Mathematics, Music, Science, Social Science, and Speech. Students compose an essay based on a prompt whose central theme incorporates information relating to the current curriculum. Students also perform a prepared speech and impromptu speech and participate in an interview before a panel of volunteer judges from the local community. The culmination of the competition is the exciting Super Quiz™ oral relay in which students have the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the broad range of the U.S. Academic Decathlon’s interdisciplinary curriculum by answering questions from seven different subject areas: art, economics, literature, mathematics, music, science, and social science. The Super Quiz™ is the only part of the actual testing that is open to the public, and it is inevitably one of the most memorable and exciting parts of the Academic Decathlon competition. Gold, silver, and bronze medals are awarded for individual events and total scores. Overall individual winners are recognized as are champion teams. The broad base of awards allows for major recognition of academic accomplishment. Teams advance through local, regional, and state levels of competition. The state champions compete at the national finals. The 2020 USAD Nationals will take place on April 30–May 2 in Anchorage, Alaska.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The United States Academic Decathlon emphasizes the personal and academic growth of each student who, by meeting the challenges with honesty and integrity, can reap the rewards of greater self-knowledge and selfconfidence for the future. The ten-event academic program strives to foster a greater respect for knowledge, to promote wholesome interschool academic competition, and to further develop student communication skills. A unique aspect of the U.S. Academic Decathlon is that it is designed to include students from all academic abilities and achievement levels. Each nine-member team consists of three Honor students (3.750 – 4.00 GPA), three Scholastic students (3.000 – 3.749 GPA), and three Varsity students (0.00 – 2.999 GPA). Each team member competes in all ten events against other students in his/her GPA division. Overall team scores are calculated using the top two individual scores from each division.

Materials for student use:

3 inch binder
Flash Drive
Earbuds
TI Nspire (recommended but not required)
Any other material that you would use for studying (highlighters, post-its, notecards, etc....)

Grading Policy

A variety of methods will be used to evaluate each student’s progress. 10% percent of the grade will come from daily assignments and quizzes, while major projects and tests will account for 90%. To ensure that each student takes the daily assignments seriously, I will from time to time use the student's average as an additional major grade included in the 90%.  The Lake Creek High School re-testing policy does not apply to Academic Decathlon.


 ·  How to Think Like a Computer Scientist (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window): A free PDF Java textbook by Allen B. Downey that you can download and read on your own if you need extra help, want to get ahead, or need to review stuff you have forgotten from last year. A great resource to use, especially if you have forgotten a lot.


·  College Board AP (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window) Computer Science Course Description: The purpose of this class is to prepare you for the AP Computer Science test at the end of the year, so we will be following the official College Board course description for Computer Science A pretty closely. Sample test questions are included in the description, so it wouldn't hurt for you to check it out.

·  Scratch (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window) or Build Your Own Blocks version (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window): A free program from MIT that can be used to code simple animations and games. 

·  Project Euler (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window): Project Euler is a series of sometimes very difficult problems that can be solved using math and/or programming. It is a GREAT way to see a practical application of things like loops and conditional statements. It is awesome.

·  HP Code Wars (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window): HP Code Wars is a fun competition put on by Hewlett-Packard with schools in the Houston area. It is always a lot of fun, and the door prizes are great. In fact, two years in a row I have had students win a brand new computers! To check out some of the problems given in previous Code Wars, click the "Sample Problems" link on the Code Wars site.

·  Computer Science UIL (opens external link in new window) (opens external link in new window): There are two parts to Computer Science UIL -- written tests and hands-on programming. The written tests are similar to my written tests thoughout the year, while the programming part is a little like the Code Wars stuff. If you glance through the website you will find some old tests and sample programs to give you an idea of what to expect.

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION OF NONDISCRIMINATION IN CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. It is the policy of Montgomery ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or handicap in its vocational programs, services or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Montgomery ISD will take steps to assure the lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs. For information about your rights or grievance procedures, contact the Title IX Coordinator, Jada Mullins (936) 276-2150 and/or the Special Education/ Section 504 Coordinator, Carolyn Fiaschetti (936)276-2462, 700 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Montgomery, Texas 77356.

Es politica de Montgomery ISD no hacer ningun tipo de discriminacion por raza, color, lugar de origen, sexo o discapacidad, respecto de sus programas, servicios o actividades vocacionales, tal como lo exige el Titulo VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964, segun enmienda; el Titulo IX sobre Emmiendas Educativas, de 1972, y la Seccion 504 de la Ley de Rehabilitacion de 1973, segun enmienda. Para mayor informacion sobre sus derechos o los procedimientos para poner una queja, comuniquese con el Coordinador del Titulo IX, Jada Mullins (936) 276-2150 y/o el Educacion Especial/ Coordinador de la Seccion 504, Carolyn Fiaschetti (936) 276-2462, 700 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Montgomery, Texas 77356.

 

 OTHER IMPORTANT THINGS TO KNOW...

     *You are expected to set up a Gradebook account to monitor your grades.

     *You must physically be in the classroom before the tardy bell rings.  All tardies are counted!

     *Dress code and cell phone policies are enforced, so you are expected to follow them.

     *Headphones are not allowed anywhere in the building.  Ever.  You may use one earbud.

    

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION OF NONDISCRIMINATION IN CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. It is the policy of Montgomery ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, or handicap in its vocational programs, services or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Montgomery ISD will take steps to assure the lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs.  For information about your rights or grievance procedures, contact the Title IX Coordinator, Jada Mullins (936) 276-2150 and/or the Special Education/ Section 504 Coordinator Meredith Burg, (936)276-2463, 20774 Eva St., Montgomery, Texas 77356.

Es politica de Montgomery ISD no hacer ningun tipo de discriminacion por raza, color, lugar de origen, genero, o discapacidad, respecto de sus programas, servicios o actividades vocacionales, tal como lo exige el Titulo VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964, segun enmienda; el Titulo IX sobre Emmiendas Educativas, de 1972, y la Seccion 504 de la Ley de Rehabilitacion de 1973, segun enmienda. Para mayor informacion sobre sus derechos o los procedimientos para poner una queja, comuniquese con el Coordinador del Titulo IX, Jada Mullins (936) 276-2150 y/o el Educacion Especial/ Coordinador de la Seccion 504, Meredith Burg (936) 276-2463, 20774 Eva St., Montgomery, Texas 77356.