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Mr. Tierranegra

Contact Information:

(936)-276-3300
octavio.tierranegra@misd.org

 

Conference Time:

1:06-1:51

 

Mr. Tierranegra's water color of his home town!
Mr. Tierranegra graduated from Sam Houston State University

Welcome to Spanish I !!!    My name is Octavio Tierranegra and I am a Spanish I teacher and the ESL coordinator for Montgomery Junior High.  I was born in Celaya, Mexico and went to Conroe High School.  I graduated from Sam Houston State University and am certified in Spanish and ESL.  My family and I have lived in Montgomery, Texas since 2002.  I am very happy to be at MJH and am looking forward to a great 2018-19 school year.

Bienvenidos a la clase de Español I

Mi nombre es Octavio Tierranegra, soy el profesor de español y coordinador del programa de ESL de la escuela Secundaria en Montgomery. Naci en Celaya Gto. México y asistí a la escuela Superior en Conroe. Me gradué de la Universidad Sam Houston con una licenciatura en español, obtengo un diplomado en ESL y español. Mi familia y yo hemos vivido en Montgomery desde el 2002. Es un placer para mi poder enseñar en MJH y espero tener un gran año escolar 2018-19 .

August-September Schedule
08/30/2018
  1. Greeting People

 

saludos                                greetings                                                Muchacho(s)/Chico/Niño     Boy(s)

¡Hola!                                  Hello!                                                    Muchacha(s)/Chica/Niña      Girl(s)

Buenos días.                       Good morning.                                      señor   sir, Mr., gentleman

Buenas tardes.                   Good afternoon.                                    señora Ms., Mrs., madam

Buenas noches.                  Good evening.                                       señorita           Miss, Ms.

¿Qué tal?                            How are things?/How are you?             Muy bien.       Very well.

Bien, gracias.                     Well (Fine), thank you.                          ¿Y tú? And you?

¿Cómo te llamas?             What’s your name?                               Me llamo…    My name is

Encantado                             charmed                                              Mucho gusto  Nice to meet you

Mal                                     bad                                                        Más o menos More or less/ok

 

                                             

 

  1. Saying good-bye

 

¡Adiós!                                Good-bye!                                             La amiga         The friend (female)

¡Chao! (Ciao!-Italian)        Good-bye!, Bye!                                    El amigo         The friend (male)

¡Hasta luego!                      See you later!                                        ¡Hasta pronto!           See you soon!

¡Hasta mañana!                 See you tomorrow!                                Mañana          Tomorrow/morning

 

  1. Speaking Politely

 

la cortesía                           courtesy                                                 De nada.                  Youre welcome.

Sí                                         yes                                                                            Por nada.               Youre welcome.

No                                       no                                                           No hay de qué.           Youre welcome.

Por favor.                           Please.                                                   Gracias.          Thank you

D. Counting in Spanish

 

 

uno 1

quince 15

veintinueve 29

dos 2

dieciséis 16

treinta 30

tres 3

diecisiete 17

treinta y uno 31

cuatro 4

dieciocho 18

treinta y dos 32

cinco 5

diecinueve 19

treinta y tres 33

seis 6

veinte 20

cuarenta 40

siete 7

veintiuno 21

cincuenta 50

ocho 8

veintidós 22

sesenta 60

nueve 9

veintitrés 23

setenta 70

diez 10

veinticuatro 24

ochenta 80

once 11

veinticinco 25

noventa 90

doce 12

veintiséis 26

cien 100

trece 13

veintisiete 27

ciento uno 101

catorce 14

veintiocho 28

ciento dos 102

 

Los colores

The colors

Amarillo yellow

Anaranjado orange

Azul blue

Morado purple

Rojo red

Blanco white

Negro black

Verde green

Café brown

Rosado/Rosa pink

 

El abecedario: a, b, c, ch, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, ll, m, n, ñ, o, p, q, r, rr, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z.

Sounds: ch, g, h, j, ll, ñ, rr

Las Vocales: a, e, i, o, u

 

 

  1. Culture

Greetings in Latin America vs. U.S.

Independencia de países hispanas en Septiembre:



Personal Pronouns
yo (I) nosotros (we, masculine)
nosotras (we, feminine)

(you, informal)
usted (you, formal)

vosotros (you, masculine)
vosotras (you, feminine)
él (he)
ella (she)
ellos (they, masculine)
ellas (they, feminine)
ustedes (you, formal)

Here are some important tips about each of the above subject pronouns.

Yo

  • It isn't necessary to capitalize yo in Spanish unless it is the first word in a sentence.
Mi mamá y yo fuimos a la tienda.
My mom and I went to the store.
Yo fui a la tienda solo.
I went to the store by myself.

  • When you are talking directly to a child, a relative, a friend, a peer, or a pet, you should use , the informal singular second person.

is written with a tilde to distinguish it from the possessive adjective tu (your).

Vos

  • Vos is used instead of in some countries, such as Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica.
  • In some countries, such as Bolivia, Chile, Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, you may hear both and vos.
  • In some countries, such as Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic, you will only ever hear .

Usted

  • Usted is used to directly address someone older, a person you do not know, a superior, or someone to whom you would like to show respect.

You can abbreviate usted as Ud. in writing.

Él, Ella

  • Él and ella are commonly used in place of a person's name.

Él is written with a tilde to differentiate it from the definite article el (the).

Nosotros-as

  • Use nosotros or nosotras when speaking about a group of which you are a part.

  • The difference between nosotros and nosotras is gender.

    • Nosotros is used to refer to a group of men only or a group made up of men and women. Even if there are ninety-nine women and only one man in a group, you still use nosotros.Nosotras is feminine and is only used when the entire group is female.

Ustedes

  • In Latin America, ustedes is used to speak directly to a group of people in both formal and informal situations.
  • In Spain, ustedes is used when talking to a group of people in a formal situation.

You can abbreviate ustedes as Uds. in writing.

 

Ellos-as

  • Ellos and ellas follow the same rules for gender as nosotros, nosotras, vosotros and vosotras.

 


 

Definite Articles

singular
plural

el masculine

los masculine
la feminine
las feminine

A definite article always has to match both the gender and number of its noun.

  • If the noun is feminine and singular (like salsa), then the article also has to be feminine and singular (la salsa).
  • If that same noun is plural (like salsas) the article is also plural (las salsas).

Check out these examples with the different definite articles in Spanish.

El libro está en el escritorio.
The book is on the desk.
La literatura española es muy interesante.
Spanish literature is very interesting.
Me gusta ir al cine los viernes.
I like to go to the movie theater on Fridays.
Son las cinco y cuarto de la tarde.
It is five fifteen in the afternoon.

 

Exceptions

When a feminine singular noun begins with a stressed a or ha sound, the masculine definite article is used instead of the feminine definite article.

Take a look of these examples of feminine words that take the masculine singular article (el) in the singular, but the feminine plural article (las) in the plural.

Singular Plural English
el águila
las águilas
the eagle(s)
el alma
las almas
the soul(s)
el agua
las aguas
the water(s)
el hacha
las hachas
the axe(s)

 

 


 

Indefinite Articles

singular
plural

un masculine

unos masculine
una feminine
unas feminine

The indefinite article always has to match both the gender and number of its noun. For example if a noun is masculine and singular (like gato), then its article also has to be masculine and singular (so, un gato). If that same noun were plural (like gatos), the article would also be plural (so, unos gatos).

Here are some more examples showing indefinite articles matching the number and gender of the nouns they modify.

¿Hay un elefante en este zoológico?
Is there an elephant in this zoo?
Quiero una galleta.
I want a cookie.
Hay unos niños en el patio.
There are a few children on the patio.
Compré unas faldas nuevas ayer.
I bought some new skirts yesterday.

Exceptions

When a feminine singular noun begins with a stressed a or ha, the masculine indefinite article (un) is used instead of the feminine indefinite article (una).

Here are some examples of feminine nouns that take the masculine indefinite article in the singular. As the table shows, they take the feminine plural article in the plural.

Singular Plural
un águila
unas águilas
un arpa
unas arpas
un hacha
unas hachas
un aula
las aulas

 


 

Direct Object Pronouns
me (to/for me) nos (to/for us)

te (to/for you informal)

os (to/for you informal)
lo - la (to/him, her,it you) los - las (to/for them, you formal)



 

Indirect Object Pronouns
me (to/for me) nos (to/for us)

te (to/for you informal)

os (to/for you informal)
le (to/him, her) les (to/for them, you formal)

Maintaining Order

When direct and indirect object pronouns are used together in a sentence, the indirect object pronoun comes before the direct object pronoun.

Marcos nos trajo la comida a nosotros.
Marcos brought the food to us.
Marcos nos la trajo.
Marcos brought it to us.
Mi madre está comprándome una pizza.
My mom is buying me a pizza.
Mi madre está comprándomela.
My mom is buying it for me.
Dame el control remoto.
Give me the remote control.
melo.
Give it to me.
No quiero decirte la verdad.
I don’t want to tell you the truth.
No quiero decírtela.
I don’t want to tell it to you.

Changing Le to Se

The indirect object pronouns le and les change to se when followed by the direct object pronouns lo, la, los and las.

le/les -> se before lo, la, los, las

Le digo el cuento a María.
I tell the story to María.
Se lo digo.
I tell it to her.
Mi abuelo les compró los regalos a los niños.
My grandfather bought gifts for the children.
Mi abuelo se los compró.
My grandfather bought them for them.

Negatives

When a sentence with object pronouns is negative, the negative word (for example, no or nunca) directly precedes any object pronouns.

No te la tengo.
I don’t have it for you.
Ella nunca compra helado para sus hijos. Ella nunca se lo compra.
She never buys ice cream for her kids. She never buys it for them.

 

Irregular prepositional phrases: conmigo = with me    contigo = with you

The  Spanish k is pronounced basically the same as it usually is in English, except perhaps a bit softer, often something like the "c" in "scatter."

The q is pronounced the same. As in English, the Spanish q is always followed by a u except in a very few words of foreign origin. Spanish is even more particular in the sequences in which the q is used: the qu is always followed by by an e or an i, and the u is silent. Thus que is pronounced something like "keh" would be in English and quien is pronounced something like "kyen."

The sound is also the same as the c sound except when the c precedes an e or i. In order to maintain the correct pronunciation, the Spanish cognates of English words with "qua" or "quo" are often spelled with a c in Spanish instead. Thus the Spanish word for "quartz" is cuarzo, and the word for "quota" is cuota.

The k is rare in Spanish, used almost exclusively for words of foreign origin such as kilo and kayak.

Cognates:

In a technical sense, two words that have a common origin are cognates. Most often, cognates are words in two languages that have a common etymology, or background, and are similar or identical. For example, the English word "kiosk" and the Spanish quiosco are cognates because they both come from the Turkish word kosk.

Cross Cultural Encounters

Spanish Colonial Expansion 1521-1830


The colonial Period was ushered in by the conquest of the Aztec and Inca empires. Political domination of indigenous peoples in the Americas was accomplished by brute military force, aided by the decimation of the population due to disease and starvation. The Spanish were driven in their efforts at conquest by two goals -- the spread of Christianity and the acquisition of new resources for the Spanish crown.


Viceroyalties were established in Mexico (New Spain) and Peru for the bureaucratic administration of these new lands. Society was stratified: colonist who had come directly from Spain held the most prestigious positions, Spaniards born in the Americas (Creoles) came next, followed by those of mixed race (Mestizos) and, finally, Indians at the bottom. There was great wealth to be had in the New Spain, and a new class of nobility emerged whose fortunes were based on land, silver, and Indian labor.


Initially, art was created in in purely European styles such as Mannerism, Baroque, and Neoclassicism, but over time regional mestizo styles emerged. Subjects were usually religious, although there was also a tradition of secular

San Antonio Museum of Art

Conjugation

Present tense conjugation of the infinitive ar ending verb. 

Hablar

yo hablo nosotros  hablamos
nosotras

  hablas

vosotros   habláis
vosotras
él
ella habla
usted

ellos
ellas  hablan
ustedes

Present tense conjugation of the infinitive er ending verb. 

Comer 

yo como nosotros  comemos
nosotras

  comes

vosotros   coméis
vosotras
él
ella come
usted
ellos
ellas  comen
ustedes

Present tense conjugation of the infinitive ir ending verb. 

Vivir 

yo vivo nosotros  vivimos
nosotras

  vives

vosotros   vivís
vosotras
él
ella vive
usted
ellos
ellas  viven
ustedes

____________________________________________________________________________

SER and ESTAR are irregular verbs. It does not follow the standard rules of conjugation for regular -ar and -er verbs. Therefore, YOU MUST MEMORIZE THEM. List of irregular verbs.

SER (permanent)
    S1 Identification of a person or thing ? Es una computadora.
Adjectives that express:
    S2 Profession / job ? Él es ingeniero. / Ella es secretaria.
    S3 Nationality ? Yo soy mexicana.
    S4 Religion ? Ella es católica.
    S5 political identification ? Nosotros somos demócratas
    S6 legal classification ? Ella es divorciada. 
S7 Possession: ? Es mi perro.
S8 Material something is made out of: ? El zapato es de plástico
S9 Adjectives indicating a personal characteristics ? Ella es alta. Height, intelligence, hair color, etc.
S10 To tell time: ? Son las 10.
S11 To express general opinions: ? Es importante usar zapatos.

Verbo ser

yo - soy nosotros - somos

tu - eres

vosotros - sois
el/ella - es ellos/ellas/ustedes - son

ESTAR (temporary)
E1 Health (temporary) ? Yo estoy bien.
E2 Emotion (temporary state) ? Ella está nerviosa.
E3 Location ? La oficina está en Houston.
E4 Present Progressive (Before a gerund) ? Ella está hablando. (or –iendo)
E5 Temporary or accidental state ? El taco está frío.

yo - estoy nosotros - estamos

tu - estás

vosotros - estáis
el/ella - está ellos/ellas/ustedes - están

____________________________________________________________________________
Verbos irregulares en español.
Presente verbo ir (to go).

yo - voy nosotros - vamos

tu - vas

vosotros - vais
el/ella - va ellos/ellas/ustedes - van

Pretérito indefinido verbo ir (to go).

yo - fui nosotros - fuimos

tu - fuiste

vosotros - fuisteis
el/ella - fue ellos/ellas/ustedes - fueron

Futuro verbo ir (to go).

yo - iré nosotros - iremos

tu - irás

vosotros -iréis
el/ella - irá ellos/ellas/ustedes - irán
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Contact Information:
(936)-276-3300 Ext: 3404
 

octavio.tierranegra@misd.org

 

Conference Time:

1:06-1:51 PM

German Vocabulary:

https://quizlet.com/_4s7ui4

__________________________________________________

French Greetings:

https://quizlet.com/_4k2eqf

French Commands:

https://quizlet.com/_4k8eao

French Numbers:

https://quizlet.com/_4k2c5j

__________________________________________________

Spanish numbers:

https://quizlet.com/_4npp6b

Spanish Greetings:

https://quizlet.com/_4npkx3

Spanish Commands:

coming soon

Class Overview and Supply List

 

This class will:

  • -Review and present new and learned Spanish vocabulary in a thematic manner.
  • -Review and introduce grammatical features of Spanish, such as accent marks, capitalization, verb conjugation, spelling, etc.
  • -Introduce a variety of Latin-American and Spanish cultural differences in language and in tradition.
  • -Further students oral and listening skills using conversational Spanish. *Because this class is aimed to meet the students’ needs and fill in gaps, it may change in nature to fulfill those needs as required by students.



Supplies needed:

  • 1 1-2 inch binder.
  • 1 Package of Expo markers (2-4 in each package)
  • 1 package of notebook paper 2
  • 1 set of 5 dividers

 


.

4-17 Dual Language 6th grade

Future Tense Quiz

Preterite Tense Quiz

Irregular Present Tense Quiz

.


.

Jeopardy Verbs Game 2

Ferdinando Quizlet

Verb Gustar Quiz

Possessive Adjectives: Quiz #1

Possessive Adj Quiz 2

Definite Articles Quiz

Indefinite Articles Quiz

  • Basic Rules of Thumb - Acentos

    If a word ends in a vowel, or 'n' or 's', the stress is usually on the next to the last syllable.

    If a word ends in a consonant other than 'n' or 's', the stress is usually on the last syllable.

    If the stress in a word doesn't follow rules 1 and 2, then the syllable that is stressed needs a written accent mark over the vowel.

  • Personal Pronouns
    yo (I) nosotros (we, masculine)
    nosotras (we, feminine)

    (you, informal)
    usted (you, formal)

    vosotros (you, masculine)
    vosotras (you, feminine)
    él (he)
    ella (she)
    ellos (they, masculine)
    ellas (they, feminine)
    ustedes (you, formal)

    Here are some important tips about each of the above subject pronouns.

    Yo

    • It isn't necessary to capitalize yo in Spanish unless it is the first word in a sentence.
    Mi mamá y yo fuimos a la tienda.
    My mom and I went to the store.
    Yo fui a la tienda solo.
    I went to the store by myself.

    • When you are talking directly to a child, a relative, a friend, a peer, or a pet, you should use , the informal singular second person.

    is written with a tilde to distinguish it from the possessive adjective tu (your).

    Vos

    • Vos is used instead of in some countries, such as Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica.
    • In some countries, such as Bolivia, Chile, Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, you may hear both and vos.
    • In some countries, such as Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic, you will only ever hear .

    Usted

    • Usted is used to directly address someone older, a person you do not know, a superior, or someone to whom you would like to show respect.

    You can abbreviate usted as Ud. in writing.

    Él, Ella

    • Él and ella are commonly used in place of a person's name.

    Él is written with a tilde to differentiate it from the definite article el (the).

    Nosotros-as

    • Use nosotros or nosotras when speaking about a group of which you are a part.

    • The difference between nosotros and nosotras is gender.

      • Nosotros is used to refer to a group of men only or a group made up of men and women. Even if there are ninety-nine women and only one man in a group, you still use nosotros.Nosotras is feminine and is only used when the entire group is female.

    Ustedes

    • In Latin America, ustedes is used to speak directly to a group of people in both formal and informal situations.
    • In Spain, ustedes is used when talking to a group of people in a formal situation.

    You can abbreviate ustedes as Uds. in writing.

     

    Ellos-as

    • Ellos and ellas follow the same rules for gender as nosotros, nosotras, vosotros and vosotras.
  • Definite Articles

    singular
    plural

    el masculine

    los masculine
    la feminine
    las feminine

    A definite article always has to match both the gender and number of its noun.

    • If the noun is feminine and singular (like salsa), then the article also has to be feminine and singular (la salsa).
    • If that same noun is plural (like salsas) the article is also plural (las salsas).

    Check out these examples with the different definite articles in Spanish.

    El libro está en el escritorio.
    The book is on the desk.
    La literatura española es muy interesante.
    Spanish literature is very interesting.
    Me gusta ir al cine los viernes.
    I like to go to the movie theater on Fridays.
    Son las cinco y cuarto de la tarde.
    It is five fifteen in the afternoon.

     

    Exceptions

    When a feminine singular noun begins with a stressed a or ha sound, the masculine definite article is used instead of the feminine definite article.

    Take a look of these examples of feminine words that take the masculine singular article (el) in the singular, but the feminine plural article (las) in the plural.

    Singular Plural English
    el águila
    las águilas
    the eagle(s)
    el alma
    las almas
    the soul(s)
    el agua
    las aguas
    the water(s)
    el hacha
    las hachas
    the axe(s)
  • Indefinite Articles

    singular
    plural

    un masculine

    unos masculine
    una feminine
    unas feminine

    The indefinite article always has to match both the gender and number of its noun. For example if a noun is masculine and singular (like gato), then its article also has to be masculine and singular (so, un gato). If that same noun were plural (like gatos), the article would also be plural (so, unos gatos).

    Here are some more examples showing indefinite articles matching the number and gender of the nouns they modify.

    ¿Hay un elefante en este zoológico?
    Is there an elephant in this zoo?
    Quiero una galleta.
    I want a cookie.
    Hay unos niños en el patio.
    There are a few children on the patio.
    Compré unas faldas nuevas ayer.
    I bought some new skirts yesterday.

    Exceptions

    When a feminine singular noun begins with a stressed a or ha, the masculine indefinite article (un) is used instead of the feminine indefinite article (una).

    Here are some examples of feminine nouns that take the masculine indefinite article in the singular. As the table shows, they take the feminine plural article in the plural.

    Singular Plural
    un águila
    unas águilas
    un arpa
    unas arpas
    un hacha
    unas hachas
    un aula
    las aulas

Our Mission

Montgomery Independent School District, with an unyielding commitment to excellence, will provide a premier academic program that recognizes the unique potential of each student and integrates the intellectual, social, cultural and physical aspects of learning.  This program will empower each student to become an eager lifelong learner committed to academic excellence, integrity, responsible citizenship and service to others.

 

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